It's not every week that begins with 38 Studios and ends with a yoga pants dispute in Barrington. But that's why Rhode Island is the gift that keeps giving. So thanks for stopping by for my weekly column. As usual, your tips are welcome and you can follow me through the week on the twitters. Here we go.

URI President David Dooley joins Bonus Q&A this week to talk about college affordability, the status of Wexford Science & Technology's proposed life-science park in the I-195 District, URI's role in helping the state's growing Latino community, and more.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

University of Rhode Island President David Dooley joins Political Roundtable this week to discuss Curt Schilling's comments on 38 Studios; ballot question 4, which would allocate $45 million in borrowing to modernize an engineering building at URI and create a so-called innovation campus; and what do about student debt.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

Here’s what’s happening in health in Rhode Island:

Onne van der Wal

The University of Rhode Island has received a three-million dollar grant from the National Science Foundation. The Graduate School of Oceanography will use the money to charter a research trip through the Canadian Arctic Northwest Passage.

During the five-week journey college students will study the effects of climate change on the arctic waters says, URI’s Gail Scowcroft, one of the lead organizers of the trip.

“The arctic is rapidly changing, and because it’s changing so fast the chemistry can give us clues as to what’s going on,” said Scowcroft.

Ian Donnis/File Photo / RIPR

In the first six months of the year, Governor Gina Raimondo left town more than a dozen times. Here's a look at what the governor has been up to.

Thirteen consecutive losing seasons. Just three winning seasons since 1985. Zero championships since the 1984 and 1985 teams won back-to-back Yankee Conference titles. Zero playoff appearances since the 1985 team lost in the quarterfinals of the NCAA I-AA Tournament.

Its 6,500-seat “stadium” tied with New Hampshire for the smallest in the Colonial Athletic Association. Except for brief streaks in the 1950s and early 1980s, no tradition of winning football going back more than a century to the inaugural campaign in 1895.

All that at an annual cost of about $3.6 million.

Wikimedia Commons

For  workers and unions, there hasn’t been much to celebrate on Labor Day in recent years. RIPR political analyst Scott MacKay says things may finally be looking up.

taylor.a/creative commons license

The University of Rhode Island has won $500,000 from the National Science Foundation to launch a graduate center focused on science writing.

The program will include workshops and classes to train students in the sciences  to write more clearly and persuasively. University officials said the program is part of a trend on college campuses, as researchers increasingly recognize the importance of communicating beyond academia.


New details are emerging about compromised email information from the University of Rhode Island. URI said the data came from a Gmail system used by the entire university.

The beach affected nearly 3,000 email addresses and passwords, belonging to both current and former students. The vast majority of the account-holders are women.

University of Rhode Island

The University of Rhode Island has urged students to change their passwords after a security breach,  involving nearly 3,000 current and former student email accounts. 

 A Rhode Island Superior Court judge will allow an employment discrimination case involving medical marijuana to go forward. The case hinges on a University of Rhode Island student’s summer job and her status as a medical marijuana cardholder.

TGIF is back in the swing of RI politics after a relaxing summer break. So thanks for stopping by, and feel free to share your tips and thoughts at idonnis (at) ripr (dot) org, and to follow me on the twitters. Let's dive in.

The Rhode Island Senate has approved legislation that would tie some funding for public colleges and universities to their performance. Supporters say the aim is to increase timely graduation rates, and the number of students in high demand fields.

The new legislation would create a set a unique set of standards for the Community College of Rhode Island, Rhode Island College, and the University of Rhode Island, to reach those goals.  Supporters say the bill would shrink the skills gap, by getting students into the workforce quicker with the appropriate education.