U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Kenneth C. Zirkel / Wikimedia Commons

A new study recently released by The Nature Conservancy, a global wildlife conservation group, has found the majority of coastal sites, such as wetlands and salt marshes, in Rhode Island and Massachusetts are vulnerable to the effects of climate change. 


Arthur Morris / VIREO

The Block Island Wind Farm now has a wildlife tracking station aimed at helping researchers learn more about offshore flight patterns of small birds and bats that are likely to become endangered or extinct in the foreseeable future unless federal action is taken. 

Pearl Macek / RIPR

The Ocean State is slated to receive $200,000 in federal funding to improve its boating infrastructure.

Charlie Biddle / Narrow River Preservation Association

An organization working to preserve the Narrow River in South County is seeking volunteers to restore the river's salt marshes that are disappearing due to climate change.


Courtesy of The Nature Conservancy and U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

Conservationists have kicked off a project this week to shore up thirty acres of salt marsh at the John H. Chafee National Wildlife Refuge. It’s one of the larger projects underway to make the state’s salt marshes more resistant to climate change.

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

Four peregrine falcons hatched earlier this spring on top of the Superman Building in downtown Providence. Volunteers have now banded the birds so that biologists can keep track of them. 

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

For the first time in years, river herring are traveling up the Saugatucket River in Wakefield without the help of humans lifting them over a dam during the spring migration. 

River herring are an important source of food for other animals. This year the Saugatucket River in Wakefield has a new fish ladder that's easier for river herring to find and swim through. Bryan Sojkowski, an engineer with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, said the new ladder replaces an old one that wasn't well designed. 

Kaity Ryan / Preservation Society of Newport County

Crews will break ground later this month on a project to bury utility lines in Middletown, near Sachuest Point. Three Aquidneck Island nonprofit groups partnered up with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to pay for the $1.2M project.

Courtesy of Bill Zinni / U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

The U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service is proposing a new national wildlife refuge in the Northeast. The refuge would include parts of Rhode Island and would protect native shrubs and small trees.

Over the past several decades, shrubs and young trees in the Northeast have been cleared for development or grown into mature forests. As those habitats have declined, scientists say so have more than 65 species of birds, mammals, reptiles, pollinating insects and other wildlife.

Photo courtesy of Peter Green

Over the next five years, dozens of volunteers will comb the Ocean State to map bird distribution. The data will be part of the state’s second bird breeding atlas, a joint undertaking by state and federal officials in partnership with the University of Rhode Island.

Lia McLaughlin / U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Work is underway to remove the White Rock Dam on the Pawcatuck River, along the Rhode Island/Connecticut border.The dam was built in 1940.

The White Rock Dam is located seven miles from the mouth of the Pawcatuck River, near Westerly and Stonington, Ct. Dams have restricted its flow since before the American Revolutionary War. The current dam stands six feet tall and more than 100 feet long. 

Scott Comings / Courtesy of The Nature Conservancy

The Pawcatuck River will have one less dam along its river in the near future. The Nature Conservancy has filed a wetlands permit application in Rhode Island to remove the White Rock Dam beginning this summer.

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

Rhode Island has lost more than half of its salt marsh habitats to erosion and other climate change impacts. Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse will tour the Narrow River tomorrow to learn about a new technique to restore eroding shorelines.