Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

About 72% of seventh graders got the HPV vaccination, according to preliminary data from the state health department. The HPV vaccine was a new requirement for this school year, and it generated complaints from some parents.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, nationally, 60% of girls between 13 and 17 had at least one HPV dose, and 41% of boys between 13 and 17 got at least one HPV dose in 2014. The recommendations are for boys and girls to receive all three doses by the time they finish high school.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

Pun intended.

It's National Influenza Vaccination Week (according to the CDC), which I read as yet one more way to snap us out of complacency and into a clinic for a flu shot.

But it seems no amount of exhortation will move some people closer to the needle (or nasal spray).

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Health officials say several adults may have been exposed to a person with the measles last weekend. The exposure might have happened in the early morning hours of Sunday, June 22nd in the emergency department at Rhode Island Hospital or later that evening in the emergency department at Roger Williams Hospital. Hospital officials say a man later diagnosed with measles presented at Rhode Island Hospital between 3 and 6 in the morning. He left against medical advice. Around 6 pm that evening he went to Roger Williams Hospital with a worsening fever.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

That depends on your priorities. But first, here's what's at issue:

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

It was only a matter of time…

The flu is now widespread in Rhode Island.

That means there are outbreaks of the flu in more than half the state. It also kicks into effect a state requirement that health care professionals who have NOT been vaccinated wear surgical masks whenever they’re in contact with patients. The health department reports that flu-related hospitalizations are up as well.

RI Dept. of Health / CDC, National Immunization Survey

Herd, as in "herd immunity," the concept being that the majority of vaccinated people protect the minority who aren't vaccinated, a kind of safety-in-numbers for your immune system. But what if the number in the minority starts to creep up?

Rhode Island Department of Health

While flu season is technically still here, Rhode Island’s Department of Health has lifted its declaration of “widespread” flu. More on the state’s response to a tough season.

Department of health head Dr. Michael Fine says he’s pleased that more health care workers and members of the general population got vaccinated against the flu this year than last. But he says the state can do better than 50%.

“If we had vaccinated instead of 500,000 Rhode Islanders, 900,000 or more, we would have expected to see many fewer hospitalizations and many fewer illnesses.”