wastewater treatment plants

Environment
8:52 am
Tue February 11, 2014

Local Environmental Leaders Call For Better Water Management

Environmental agency directors and city managers focused on the urgent need to invest in wastewater infrastructure, stormwater management, and flood prevention at a meeting last night.

The nonprofit Save The Bay hosted its annual legislative briefing.  Executive director Jonathan Stone said many groups are working together to ensure the general assembly approves Gov. Lincoln Chafee's 75-million-dollar clean water bond.

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Local Feature
9:46 am
Thu January 23, 2014

Debrief: What Does It Mean To Reduce Nitrogen In Narragansett Bay?

A local quahog fisherman is happy with the improving the health of Narragansett Bay. He harvested these quahogs on a recent chilly and windy morning.
Credit Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

Rhode Island is remarkably close to meeting a goal of reducing nitrogen discharged in upper Narragansett Bay by 50 percent. Upgrades at wastewater treatment plants have played a major role in helping meet this goal. Rhode Island Public Radio’s environment reporter Ambar Espinoza joined Elisabeth Harrison in the studio to talk about what it means to reduce the amount of nitrogen we put into the bay.

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Environment
4:00 am
Sun January 19, 2014

Flushable Wipes Problematic For Rhode Island Wastewater Treatment Plants

Wet wipes marketed as "flushable" are not designed to break down as quickly as regular toilet paper breaks down. Instead, the wipes create expensive clogs and blockages when they bind with oils that are poured down drains.
Credit Courtesy of Warwick Sewer Authority

Those wet wipes marketed as “flushable” are causing major costly problems for sewer systems across Rhode Island.

Managers at wastewater treatment facilities say just because the wipes are flushable doesn’t mean that they break down as easily and quickly as regular toilet paper. Instead they clog pump stations and sewer pipes, forcing treatment plants to spend time and money unclogging their systems.

Warwick Sewer Authority Superintendent Janine Burke says removing those wet wipe clogs takes man power, up to three employees at her facility.

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