WBUR

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With all the focus on the ugly, roller-coaster presidential campaign, a referendum closer to Rhode Island’s borders hasn’t received much media attention in the waning days of the campaign. That would be the Massachusetts ballot question that would legalize recreational marijuana, which voters consider on Tuesday.

The latest public opinion survey for WBUR, Boston’s npr affiliate, shows a 15-point gap in favor of making the weed legal. The poll, conducted by MassINC, showed 55 percent in favor and 40 percent opposed.

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A new poll from Boston public radio station WBUR finds growing support for a ballot measure that would legalize recreational marijuana. In Rhode Island, advocates have pushed for a similar measure, but some local lawmakers say they will wait to see what happens in the Bay State before taking up the issue.

New Production Studio at RIPR
Aaron Read RIPR

Late last week I was very happy to execute the final changeover to RIPR's new PRODUCTION STUDIO.  This is a big deal for us; our studios were originally designed and constructed by WBUR, way back in the late 1990's when they owned RIPR (then just "WRNI") outright, and most of the "back office" personnel were still located in Boston.

Accordingly, we only have one "studio".  It's two connected rooms: a "control room" with the usual mix board, producer's station, director's station, etc...and a "mic booth" with just a trio of mics.   The idea was that a lot of the day-to-day, off-air, production work was happening up in Boston, where WBUR had four main studios and seven edit booths.  So the workload on RIPR's end would be pretty light.

Fast-forward to 2007 and now we're an independent news radio station with nine news staff and a ton of daily production needs.  Yet only one studio to do it in!  AAAAAHHHH!!!  Scheduling conflicts were rampant.

My friend Sacha Pfeiffer at WBUR filed this story for NPR about a ballot question Massachusetts voters will be asked to answer this November.  If voters approve the measure, that would make it the third state to legalize a lethal prescription for terminally ill patients who wish to end their lives.