women

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

A group of Rhode Islanders plan to join a national day of protest Saturday morning against Planned Parenthood.  Rhode Island Right to Life and the Roman Catholic Diocese of Providence say they will be among those calling on lawmakers to stop public funding for the health care organization.

 The protests come after secretly filmed videos emerged last month of Planned Parenthood officials discussing the use of fetal tissue for medical research. Anti-abortion activists claim the group is using federal funding to illegally traffic body parts.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

An 11-year-old Newport girl, Khatima Bulmer, got VIP access to the corridors of power at the Statehouse as the state’s governor for a day on Wednesday.

Bulmer got the distinction by winning an essay contest organized by the Ocean State’s first female governor, Gina Raimondo.

A pregnancy discrimination case before the US Supreme Court now hinges on legal language that’s open to interpretation. But two Rhode Island cities have written their own rules about pregnant workers.

Central Falls and Providence both passed city-wide ordinances earlier this year to protect pregnant workers from on-the-job discrimination. Women’s Fund of Rhode Island spokeswoman Shandi Hanna said employers in those cities must now give pregnant workers reasonable accommodations, like extra bathroom breaks or lighter duties. And that’s a trend she’d like to see continue.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

During a Friday morning speech at Rhode Island College, President Obama touted economic improvements during his administration and called for enhanced efforts to help women at home and in the workplace. The president didn't mention Democratic gubernatorial candidate Gina Raimondo during his speech, although he did treat her to lunch afterward at the Gregg's restaurant on North Main Street in Providence.

Obama began with some Halloween-related humor and a recognition of Rhode Island's congressional delegation before pointing to a series of economic indicators:

Mayo Clinic

Governor Lincoln Chafee has signed legislation that requires health care providers to tell women if they have dense breast tissue. The law is aimed at helping detect cancers a mammogram might miss.

Dense breast tissue is pretty common, especially in younger women. The issue is that dense tissue can make it more difficult for a mammogram to “see” cancerous growths. You may not be able to tell whether your breasts are made up of more dense tissue, but a radiologist can see it on a mammogram.

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