World War II

Manuel C. Correira

Bristol – There will be floats, bands and puppets, the trill of bagpipes and Sousa marches.

The sailors will step smartly down Hope Street, where the  red, white and blue traffic stripes have  replaced the mundane  yellow strips. The historic harbor is filling with boats, their white sails riffling in the afternoon breeze.

There will be flags, thousands of them. Some will hang from the stately 18th  and 19th century colonials that grace Bristol’s waterfront. The wooly-headed blue hydrangeas sprout from lawns grand and modest.


Rhode Island will mark its annual Victory Day holiday Monday. The holiday marking the US victory over Japan in World War 2 is not without some controversy.

Rhode Island has for years been the only state to still celebrate what was once known as Victory Over Japan Day. Thanks to support from veterans and other defenders, the holiday has survived occasional attempts to rename or eliminate it.

In cities and towns throughout Rhode Island Monday, people gathered at parades and solemn ceremonies to mark Memorial Day – the day set aside to honor soldiers, sailors and airmen who have died in the line of duty.  At the Rhode Island Veterans Cemetery in Warwick the day was dedicated to a single serviceman whose sacrifice was overlooked for decades.