Education

John Bender / RIPR

How do you turn around a struggling middle school? It’s a question teachers, administrators, and city leaders are trying to figure out in the state’s biggest school district. Providence is focusing this year on its middle schools.

With the flip of the calendar to September, the lull of late summer will soon give way to a burst of political activity: a special legislative session, an intensifying PawSox debate, and the march to the 2018 campaign season. So thanks for stopping by. Your tips and comments are welcome, and you can follow me through the week on the twitters. (A quick program note: I'm taking some time off next week, so TGIF will return on September 15). Here we go.

Ian Donnis/File Photo / RIPR

Robert A. Walsh Jr., executive director of the National Education Association Rhode Island teachers union, joins Bonus Q&A to discuss a range of subjects, including the upcoming special legislative session, school building needs in Rhode Island, the state of the labor movement, and much more.

Courtesy Brian Glyn Williams

It’s back to school season, a time when many students are asked, "What did you do over the summer?" Well, one professor at the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth has an intriguing answer to that question.

History professor Brian Glyn Williams traveled to Iraq, where he helped rescue a young girl from ISIS.

Gage Skidmore / CC BY-SA 2.0

The country’s largest teacher’s union, the National Education Association, wraps up its 155th annual meeting Wednesday, in Boston.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

A slew of bills heads for Gov. Gina Raimondo’s signature as the General Assembly nears the end of the legislative session. Here’s a brief list of what’s on the table.

RIPR file photo

This week Rhode Island lawmakers unveiled a $9.2 billion spending plan that avoids a major tax increase, while closing a $134 million deficit. How did they do it? Rhode Island Public Radio’s Elisabeth Harrison turns to our political analyst Scott MacKay.

RIPR FILE PHOTO

The Providence City Council is expected to vote on the new city budget tonight. The $376 million proposal includes an increase in spending for the city’s schools.

RIPR FILE PHOTO

Providence city councilors will soon vote on a new budget that would increase spending on public schools for the first time in seven years. The district wants to use some of that money to improve its struggling middle schools.

Courtesy of Brown University / Virtual Reality For Education

Over the weekend the city of Warwick celebrated the 245th anniversary of the burning of the British ship, the HMS Gaspee.  Many Rhode Islanders consider it one of the earliest clashes in the American Revolution. The skirmish is often overshadowed by the better known Boston Tea Party, which took place more than a year later.

Now a group of Brown University students is working to raise the profile of the Gaspee Affair. They're creating a virtual reality experience aimed at middle and high school students.

Rhode Island Foundation

Two Rhode Island women, Ditra Edwards and Donna Childs, are the recipients of $300,000 in grants from the Rhode Island Foundation to help improve civic engagement.

National Education Association RI executive director Robert Walsh joins Bonus Q&A to discuss public education and charter schools, the challenges facing national Democrats, and much more.

courtesy of URI

The House Finance Committee is set to hear testimony on Governor Gina Raimondo's free college tuition plan Wednesday.

Gage Skidmore / Flickr/ Creative Commons License

Rhode Island’s congressional delegation expressed skepticism after President Donald Trump’s first address to a joint session of Congress, Tuesday.

RIPR FILE PHOTO

The heads of three Rhode Island universities join a growing list of leaders at higher learning institutions opposing President Trump’s executive order banning refugees and immigrants from seven predominantly Muslim countries.

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