Education

Brown Reports Four Students Contracted Mumps

Dec 5, 2017
Claus Rebler / CC BY 2.0 VIA FLICKR

Four Brown University students have contracted the mumps, the latest in a series of outbreaks on college campuses across the country.

Chris Potter / CC BY 2.0 VIA FLICKR

George Blessing, a staff psychologist at Cranston High School West, is accused of failing to report allegations to child welfare authorities of, “sexual abuse of a child in an educational program.” Blessing is the first person to face charges under Rhode Island’s newly amended child abuse reporting law. A hearing on a motion to dismiss the trial, as well as the potential start of the trial itself had to be postponed, after the prosecutor from the Attorney General's office fell ill. The trial has been rescheduled for early January.

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The Community College of Rhode Island has been in talks with India-based tech company Infosys for months about a training partnership. The talks were part of the negotiation that brought a new Infosys design hub to Providence.

There's barely a month left in 2017, meaning we're on the brink of what promises to be a dynamic election year in Rhode Island. So thanks for stopping by for my weekly column. As usual, your tips and comments are welcome, and you can follow me through the week on the twitters. Here we go.

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In this multi-part series, "Striking a New Chord: A 15-Week Journey To Learning An Instrument," RIPR’s Morning Edition host Chuck Hinman follows a beginning adult ensemble class for violin, viola, cello and bass in Bristol, RI.


Students in Rhode Island say they’d like more direction at school when it comes to things like college and job planning. Those are just a couple of things that students say they want from their education.  The students spoke out as part of a report from the children’s advocacy nonprofit Rhode Island Kids Count.

John Bender / RIPR

Across the country, and in New England, elementary schools are revamping recess with a focus on organized games and teamwork, instead of free play.

John Bender / RIPR

How do you turn around a struggling middle school? It’s a question teachers, administrators, and city leaders are trying to figure out in the state’s biggest school district. Providence is focusing this year on its middle schools.

With the flip of the calendar to September, the lull of late summer will soon give way to a burst of political activity: a special legislative session, an intensifying PawSox debate, and the march to the 2018 campaign season. So thanks for stopping by. Your tips and comments are welcome, and you can follow me through the week on the twitters. (A quick program note: I'm taking some time off next week, so TGIF will return on September 15). Here we go.

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Robert A. Walsh Jr., executive director of the National Education Association Rhode Island teachers union, joins Bonus Q&A to discuss a range of subjects, including the upcoming special legislative session, school building needs in Rhode Island, the state of the labor movement, and much more.

Courtesy Brian Glyn Williams

It’s back to school season, a time when many students are asked, "What did you do over the summer?" Well, one professor at the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth has an intriguing answer to that question.

History professor Brian Glyn Williams traveled to Iraq, where he helped rescue a young girl from ISIS.

Gage Skidmore / CC BY-SA 2.0

The country’s largest teacher’s union, the National Education Association, wraps up its 155th annual meeting Wednesday, in Boston.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

A slew of bills heads for Gov. Gina Raimondo’s signature as the General Assembly nears the end of the legislative session. Here’s a brief list of what’s on the table.

RIPR file photo

This week Rhode Island lawmakers unveiled a $9.2 billion spending plan that avoids a major tax increase, while closing a $134 million deficit. How did they do it? Rhode Island Public Radio’s Elisabeth Harrison turns to our political analyst Scott MacKay.

RIPR FILE PHOTO

The Providence City Council is expected to vote on the new city budget tonight. The $376 million proposal includes an increase in spending for the city’s schools.

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