Local Features

Dancing For A World Record At PVD Fest

Jun 12, 2018

Thousands of people visited downtown Providence this weekend for the city’s annual arts and culture extravaganza: PVD Fest.  And this year, organizers sought to break an obscure world record: largest choreographed group Bachata dance.

The record to beat is 370 dancing couples, set in 2016 in Greece. 

In Providence, participants started gathered downtown Friday evening. Dance instructors from Mambo Pa Ti studio in Providence hyped the crowd up and encouraged passersby to join in.  

Juan Rodriguez

Eileen Sheehan lives only about a couple hundred feet away from the Westport River. Through the windows in her living room, you can see light from the sun twinkling off the water. 

However, Sheehan said these days, it's depressing to look out into the river because of what's been happening to the salt marsh islands. 

Erin X. Smithers

“The Pirates of Penzance,” that 19th Century view of a Great Britain long gone, is rarely seen these days. But the Wilbury Theater Group has revived it. 

RIPR

Care New England announced Wednesday that it has signed an agreement for a takeover of Rhode Island’s second-largest hospital network by Boston-based Partners HealthCare.

 

The deal, if approved by federal and state regulators, would mark a giant shift in Rhode Island’s healthcare market, granting Massachusetts’ largest health system huge influence -- and pricing power -- over Rhode Island’s health system.

 


Pearl Macek

After two weeks at Fort Adams State Park, boat crews in the Volvo Ocean Race will embark Sunday on the ninth leg of the race. The around-the-world sailing challenge is nearing a finish in June in the Netherlands.


Elisabeth Harrison / RIPR

Since the deadly school shooting in Parkland, Florida, parents and teachers across the country are wondering how to make schools safer. In Rhode Island, State Police Captain Derek Borek reviews school safety plans and works with school administrators to improve school security measures. 

Chris Potter

A hearing has been continued, in the Providence Journal's lawsuit against a judge, following a high-profile murder trial. Karen Bordeleau, president of the New England First Amendment Coalition and a former executive editor of The Providence Journal, discusses the lawsuit. Bordeleau said an order from Superior Court Judge Netti Vogel barring access to the jury was not normal procedure for the court.   

Elisabeth Harrison

What happens when people can be mortgaged like property? Sharon Ann Murphy, professor of history at Providence College, has received an American Council of Learned Societies fellowship for her project "Banking on Slavery in the Antebellum South." She spoke with RIPR's Chuck Hinman about her research.


Chuck Hinman

After the 2016 presidential election, Rob Blair, an assistant professor of political science at Brown University, began teaching a new course. It's designed to answer one question: is our democracy failing? And it’s proven to be popular enough to go nationwide. Blair claims that this is not an anti-Trump course.

Roderick Coover

Brown University honored fiction writer Robert Coover this month with a three-day festival, "International Fiction Now: Celebrating the Unspeakable Practices of Robert Coover and the International Writers Project."

PJ Fox / ISPN

As the National School Walkout movement to fight gun violence continues across the country, RIPR's Chuck Hinman talked to two members of Providence's Youth Peace Ambassador Program, about their efforts to address violence inside their schools and their communities.


Courtesy RI Department of Motor Vehicles

Maybe you’ve already heard of something called Real ID. If not, you probably will soon. In the coming years, Real ID will affect how you board airplanes or walk into a federal building.

So what is it?

It’s a new designation for identification, like state IDs or driver’s licenses. Real ID is actually a federal law that sets national security standards for ID cards. The law was passed in 2005 as part of recommendations from the 9/11 Commission.

Robin Lubbock

Army veteran Brandon Korona pulls up his pant leg, rearranges a protective sleeve, and twists off the plastic socket on top of his prosthetic left leg. It comes off with a suction cup-like pop.

"There we go," says Korona.

Patrick Skahill / WNPR

Thumb on the scaleloading the dice -- the English language is full of idioms for people who cheat the system.

If you’ve ever wondered why so many of those expressions invoke images of weights and measures, a good “rule of thumb” is to look back at New England’s colonial history, when standardizing the way we define our world today was a priority.

John Bender / RIPR

For decades, Liberian refugees were allowed to live and work in the U.S. following the Liberian Civil War of the 1990s. President Donald Trump announced the end of that policy in March, giving protected Liberians just one year to prepare for deportation.

Liberians living in Southern New England are confused and disappointed. The Whitehouse says the Liberian policy is no longer necessary, because country is stable after years of war and the 2014 Ebola outbreak. But local Liberians disagree.

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