Local Features

Courtesy RI Department of Motor Vehicles

Maybe you’ve already heard of something called Real ID. If not, you probably will soon. In the coming years, Real ID will affect how you board airplanes or walk into a federal building.

So what is it?

It’s a new designation for identification, like state IDs or driver’s licenses. Real ID is actually a federal law that sets national security standards for ID cards. The law was passed in 2005 as part of recommendations from the 9/11 Commission.

Robin Lubbock

Army veteran Brandon Korona pulls up his pant leg, rearranges a protective sleeve, and twists off the plastic socket on top of his prosthetic left leg. It comes off with a suction cup-like pop.

"There we go," says Korona.

Patrick Skahill / WNPR

Thumb on the scaleloading the dice -- the English language is full of idioms for people who cheat the system.

If you’ve ever wondered why so many of those expressions invoke images of weights and measures, a good “rule of thumb” is to look back at New England’s colonial history, when standardizing the way we define our world today was a priority.

John Bender / RIPR

For decades, Liberian refugees were allowed to live and work in the U.S. following the Liberian Civil War of the 1990s. President Donald Trump announced the end of that policy in March, giving protected Liberians just one year to prepare for deportation.

Liberians living in Southern New England are confused and disappointed. The Whitehouse says the Liberian policy is no longer necessary, because country is stable after years of war and the 2014 Ebola outbreak. But local Liberians disagree.

Jane Pickens Theater

The American director James Ivory has been a filmmaking success story for more than 30 years, mostly with his company Merchant/Ivory Productions. Now 89, he's still going strong.

John Bender / RIPR

Thousands of Liberian refugees living in the United States have one year left before they face deportation.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

Planning officials, neighborhood groups and developers are gathering Thursday at the Rhode Island Convention Center for Grow Smart Rhode Island’s Power of Place Summit. The annual summit is meant to showcase ideas for developing stronger, more vibrant communities. Grow Smart RI’s executive director, Scott Wolf, said one of the new obstacles to smarter development is what he calls “renewable energy sprawl.”

Lynn Arditi / RIPR

 

A research team led by Rhode Island Hospital’s chief of infectious diseases has discovered a new class of antibiotics that could one day help fight bacteria that have developed resistance to current antibiotics.

Center for Biological Diversity

The endangered North Atlantic right whale population took a big hit last year, with a record number killed by fishing gear entanglements and ship strikes. And researchers have so far been unable to find any evidence of new calves born this year.

This I Believe New England: Paying Attention

Mar 27, 2018
Scott Indermaur

Paying attention.  Two words.  Five syllables.  It sounds so simple.  But if we're completely honest with ourselves, how many of us would have a hard time raising our hands claiming that we're good at paying attention, really paying attention, as we march through our lives?  Are we staring at our smartphone screens in lieu of connecting with the people we really care about?  Are we racing from Point A to Point B without noticing the remarkable moon hanging right above us or the tree blossoms unfolding right in front of our eyes?

Ian Donnis / RIPR

ATTLEBORO -- Considering his famous last name, U.S. Rep. Joe Kennedy III has kept a relatively low profile.

Chuck Hinman / RIPR

Thousands of people thronged the lawn of the Rhode Island Statehouse in Providence Saturday afternoon. They came together as hundreds of thousands of demonstrators gathered nationwide and around the world for March For Our Lives protests held to demand action to stop school shootings and gun violence in general. 

Don Treeger / The Republican / MassLive.com

Groups tracking hate crimes said there's a marked increase in the number of racist slurs and white supremacist group activity found scrawled on college campuses around the country and in New England.

Avory Brookins

Many high school students take the time to tour colleges a year before graduation. However, as roads, businesses, and schools are closed across Rhode Island due to the weather that was not the case.

First The Storm, Now The Cleanup... Again

Mar 13, 2018
John Bender

The third winter storm this month knocked out power to tens of thousands of residents and businesses, closed schools and state offices, and dropped more than foot of snow in some parts of Rhode Island and the South Coast. Blizzard conditions were confirmed in some areas, including Newport.

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