Local Features

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

What’s broken about Rhode Island’s mental health system and what would it take to fix the problems? 

Shannon Dooling / WBUR

 

Muslims in America are the subject of heated political debate. But they account for a very small number of elected politicians in New England.

Christy Clark-Pujara is an assistant professor of history in the Department of African-American Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and the author of the recent book "Dark Work: the Business of Slavery in Rhode Island." 


Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

Online health insurance marketplaces like Rhode Island’s HealthSource RI are a key feature of the Affordable Care Act. Nearly 30,000 Rhode Islanders buy health insurance plans through the exchange, and most receive some kind of federal subsidy to help pay for those plans. But Obamacare is under fire, and there’s a lot of uncertainty about these marketplaces. 


Kristin Gourlay / RIPR


Problems with the state’s new online public assistance system, UHIP, are much more significant than anyone realized. 

Rhode Island Historical Preservation & Heritage Commission

On the National Register of Historic Places, the Ochee Spring Quarry in Johnston preserves a record of soapstone bowl-making dating back at least 3,000 years.

Karen Brown / NEPR

Most days, somewhere in New England, the American Red Cross and other blood banks put out the call for donations — and volunteers offer up their veins for the public good.


Providence Business News Editor Mark Murphy joins Rhode Island Public Radio's Dave Fallon for our weekly business segment, The Bottom Line.

This week Dave and Mark are joined by former Blue Cross-Blue Shield of RI President and CEO James Purcell.

The three discuss the Trump Administration and the future of the Affordable Care Act. The also talk about Trump cabinet pick Tom Price for Secretary of Health and Human Services, and possible changes in Medicaid.

When to listen:

Chuck Hinman / RIPR

Opened in 1959, Town Hall Lanes is a staple of Johnston. Birthday parties are commonplace, and local bowling teams are there every weekend. In today’s One Square Mile: Johnston, a postcard from a town favorite.


Ian Donnis/File Photo / RIPR

State representative Aaron Regunburg has been chairing a House committee on the use of solitary confinement in Rhode Island’s prisons. Solitary has been shown to damage mental health, and a high percentage of attempted suicides in prisons take place in solitary confinement. The question on the table: is this tool worth the cost to an inmate’s mental and physical health? 

John Bender / RIPR

King’s Tabernacle Church took the town of Johnston to court last year after town officials appeared to be trying to block the congregation from moving into a long-abandoned building in town. The church, whose congregation is small and largely African American, cited racial bias. But today the community is thriving in the heart of one of the most Italian, Catholic areas of the state.

John Bender

At a time of increasing debate over racial, religious and political divides, Rhode Islanders share their experiences of reaching beyond the differences that keep many communities apart.

In this ongoing series, we meet people like Adewole Akinbi and Heather Gaydos, whose professional relationship has evolved into something more like family after the death of a co-worker. We also meet a former gang member, Jose Rodriguez, who has become friends with the Providence police officer who once hassled him on the streets.

Paul B. Goode / Firstworks and Paul Taylor Dance Company

The Paul Taylor Dance Company is often called America’s finest dance organization. The troupe performed in Providence over the weekend, premiering a brand new dance that will open this week in New York City. Rhode Island Public Radio’s Bill Gale says the performance was well worth watching.


Ambar Espinoza

In recent years, Rhode Islanders have spotted wild visitors not typically found in the Ocean State: Arctic beluga whales in Narragansett Bay and even snowy owls. It turns out the Central Landfill in Johnston is another draw for wildlife.

Providence Business News Editor Mark Murphy joins Rhode Island Public Radio's Dave Fallon for our weekly business segment, The Bottom Line.

This week Dave and Mark discuss business development in suburban Johnston, the town that lured Citizens Bank to build a new campus. Governor Gina Raimondo toured the construction site on Thursday. 

Mark and Dave are joined by Realtor Pete Hayes of Cushman & Wakefield/Hayes & Sherry. Haynes ​was involved in the siting of the new FM Global office in Johnston and the new Citizens Bank complex.

Pages