Local Features

Will Hart / Creative Commons License via Wikimedia Commons

It's been a difficult week for people under DACA, or Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, the program protecting thousands of undocumented young people from deportation, if their parents brought them to this country as children. 

Jill Kaufman / New England Public Radio


  In New England, 22 percent of the region's native plants are considered rare. Some of them are on the federal list of endangered species. Biologists worldwide and locally have been saving crop seeds, and seeds from other plants important to the ecosystem.

Lynn Arditi / RIPR

Prescription opioids aren’t the only medication that public health officials worry about doctors over-prescribing. Another is antibiotics.


The Kheel Center for Labor-Management Documentation and Archives / CC BY-ND 2.0 Via Flickr

It’s Labor Day, the holiday celebrating working people. That got RIPR political analyst Scott MacKay thinking about unions, and the decline of organized labor in the private economy.  

Courtesy Brian Glyn Williams

It’s back to school season, a time when many students are asked, "What did you do over the summer?" Well, one professor at the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth has an intriguing answer to that question.

History professor Brian Glyn Williams traveled to Iraq, where he helped rescue a young girl from ISIS.

New Bedford Fishing Heritage Center

According to a recent Harris Poll, nearly 30 percent of Americans have at least one tattoo. And of those who have one, close to 70 percent have two or more. More and more Americans have been getting them, and their popularity is strongest among Millennials and Gen Xers. But humans have been marking themselves in this way for thousands of years. An exhibit that celebrates the maritime aspect of this tradition opened in August at New Bedford’s Fishing Heritage Center. For this month’s Artscape:  Nautical Tattoos, and the Stories Behind Them


Youth Rugby Grows Despite Concern Over Concussions

Aug 30, 2017
Sofia Rudin / RIPR

Rugby is on the rise. In fact, it’s the fastest growing sport in the country. But it’s also dangerous.

Courtesy of Steven Richard Photography

Theatre by the Sea in Matunuck is closing its season with one of Broadway’s biggest hits, “The Producers.”  Rhode Island Public Radio’s Bill Gale says the musical still holds all its charms.

marclevitt.org

The triple-decker, in some places, is a big sandwich. But here in New England, the triple-decker is a particular kind of rental housing: a three-story apartment building, usually of wood-frame construction, with each floor consisting of one apartment. 

Elisabeth Harrison

In her new book “Morningstar,” author Ann Hood examines the transformative power of literature. Hood recalls how a childhood of almost obsessive reading led her to dream of leaving the small New England factory town where she grew up.

Pearl Macek / RIPR

This week, Newport is hosting a first in the sailing world: the J Class world championships. J Class yachts are rare, and they’re huge. 

Courtesy of Many Hats Productions

The documentary “Etched in Glass” follows Holocaust survivor Steve Ross, who became the driving force behind the New England Holocaust Memorial in Boston.

Ross told his story to many urban teenagers, hoping it would help them overcome racism and poverty.

Elisabeth Harrison / RIPR

Thousands of people gathered at Roger Williams Park on Friday for a night of live music with the RI Philharmonic pops orchestra. 

Elisabeth Harrison / RIPR

Every summer, many American audiences are reintroduced to a classic, the "1812 Overture." The only problem is, this piece by Peter Tchaikovsky isn’t American at all.

In fact, it has nothing to with the USA. 

RIPR File Photo

A new piece of classical music gets its American premiere Friday at the Rhode Island Philharmonic pops concert in Roger Williams Park. Composer Paul Desenne wrote the piece as a new take on a traditional Viennese polka.


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