Local Features

Ian Donnis/File Photo / RIPR

State representative Aaron Regunburg has been chairing a House committee on the use of solitary confinement in Rhode Island’s prisons. Solitary has been shown to damage mental health, and a high percentage of attempted suicides in prisons take place in solitary confinement. The question on the table: is this tool worth the cost to an inmate’s mental and physical health? 

John Bender / RIPR

King’s Tabernacle Church took the town of Johnston to court last year after town officials appeared to be trying to block the congregation from moving into a long-abandoned building in town. The church, whose congregation is small and largely African American, cited racial bias. But today the community is thriving in the heart of one of the most Italian, Catholic areas of the state.

John Bender

At a time of increasing debate over racial, religious and political divides, Rhode Islanders share their experiences of reaching beyond the differences that keep many communities apart.

In this ongoing series, we meet people like Adewole Akinbi and Heather Gaydos, whose professional relationship has evolved into something more like family after the death of a co-worker. We also meet a former gang member, Jose Rodriguez, who has become friends with the Providence police officer who once hassled him on the streets.

Paul B. Goode / Firstworks and Paul Taylor Dance Company

The Paul Taylor Dance Company is often called America’s finest dance organization. The troupe performed in Providence over the weekend, premiering a brand new dance that will open this week in New York City. Rhode Island Public Radio’s Bill Gale says the performance was well worth watching.


Ambar Espinoza

In recent years, Rhode Islanders have spotted wild visitors not typically found in the Ocean State: Arctic beluga whales in Narragansett Bay and even snowy owls. It turns out the Central Landfill in Johnston is another draw for wildlife.

Providence Business News Editor Mark Murphy joins Rhode Island Public Radio's Dave Fallon for our weekly business segment, The Bottom Line.

This week Dave and Mark discuss business development in suburban Johnston, the town that lured Citizens Bank to build a new campus. Governor Gina Raimondo toured the construction site on Thursday. 

Mark and Dave are joined by Realtor Pete Hayes of Cushman & Wakefield/Hayes & Sherry. Haynes ​was involved in the siting of the new FM Global office in Johnston and the new Citizens Bank complex.

Chuck Hinman

Johnston is home to one of the oldest houses in Rhode Island: the Clemence-Irons House, built in 1691. It's right on George Waterman Road, but if you don't slow down, you'll miss it. 

The Wilbury Group

Providence's Wilbury Group is doing Harold Pinter's 1978 play “Betrayal” a drama of many turns, many changes. Rhode Island Public Radio's Bill Gale has the review.

Ian Donnis/File Photo / RIPR

Cranston Mayor Allan Fung joins Political Roundtable to discuss the settlement involving the last defendant in the 38 Studios case, his level of concern over President Donald Trump's executive order on immigration, and his political future.

Trump's Travel Ban Hits Rhode Island Refugees

Feb 2, 2017
Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

Since President Donald Trump signed an executive order banning travel from seven Muslim-majority nations, many refugees are in limbo. They’re waiting abroad, and some of their family members are waiting for them here.

Ximena Conde / RIPR

This week our series "One Square Mile" is getting to know the town of Johnston. And if you’ve ever taken a drive on Greenville Avenue in Johnston, you’ll notice residential homes across the street from working farms. Johnston used to be home to many dairy farms and orchards that over time have dwindled to roughly a dozen working farms.

Elisabeth Harrison

All this week we’re hearing stories from Johnston, the Rhode Island town that flipped the most dramatically from blue to red in the presidential election. 

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

If the Affordable Care Act is repealed without a replacement, hospitals in Rhode Island could take a hit. 

The state has reached a $16 million settlement with Hilltop Securities (formerly First Southwest), the last defendant in Rhode Island's lawsuit over 38 Studios.

If the deal wins court approval, there will not be a trial stemming from the state's lawsuit over the 2012 failure of the video game company -- and no testimony from key figures in what proved to be an expensive mistake for the state and its citizens.

John Bender / RIPR


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