NPR News

NPR Survey: Still On Facebook, But Worried

4 minutes ago

Facebook has come under intense scrutiny in the wake of revelations that election data company Cambridge Analytica accessed the private Facebook data of 50 million users. The social media giant is facing questions from U.S. and British regulators, and withering criticism in the press.

But the scandal is grounded in everyday America — after all, it was the millions of women, men, parents, grandparents, friends and old acquaintances on the site who had their data accessed.

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg issued a lengthy post Wednesday on his personal Facebook page promising to protect the data of platform users.

He said Facebook will provide users with tools to show who has access to their data and how it is shared. Facebook will also "restrict developers' data access even further to prevent other kinds of abuse."

"We have a responsibility to protect your data, and if we can't, then we don't deserve to serve you," he wrote.

This story will be updated.

A single four-letter word – added to a provision of the tax code – has professional sports leagues scrambling, as teams face what could be millions of dollars in new taxes.


The revision changed a section of the tax code that applies to "like-kind exchanges." Under the old law, farmers, manufacturers and other businesses could swap certain "property" assets – such as trucks and machinery – without immediately paying taxes on the difference in value.

Facebook Under Fire

10 minutes ago

With Kimberly Atkins

Facebook’s under intense scrutiny over how Cambridge Analytica used its customer information — meanwhile, that company’s leader, Alexander Nix, is suspended after an undercover investigation. Should the social network to be regulated? Can you even opt out of the dominant social media company on Earth?

This show airs Wednesday at 10 a.m. EST.


Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit

More Details Emerge About Austin Bomber

47 minutes ago

Copyright 2018 KERA. To see more, visit KERA.

Authorities say Mark Anthony Conditt, the man suspected in the recent series of deadly Austin-area bombings, died in a blast that he intentionally triggered as police closed in on him Wednesday.

Questions now turn to Conditt's background and what drove his killing spree.

A friend of the suspect, Jeremiah Jensen, describes Conditt as shy, smart and thoughtful. Jensen attended church with Conditt and says he was "pretty good friends" with him in 2012 and 2013. Jensen says Conditt never exhibited tendencies that made him think he'd be "capable of something like this."

The man police identified as the suspect in the Austin, Texas, bombings killed himself early Wednesday morning, detonating a bomb as officers approached his vehicle to arrest him.

Here & Now‘s Peter O’Dowd gets the latest from Austin with Matt Largey (@mattlargey), managing editor at KUT.

The White House is set to release plans Wednesday for tariffs and other trade regulations against China. One of the main sticking points centers on intellectual property, as well as imports. U.S. industries will have a chance to weigh in on which products should be subject to tariffs, according to the administration.

Here & Now‘s Peter O’Dowd speaks with Roben Farzad (@robenfarzad), who hosts “Full Disclosure” on NPR One.

Alabama Sen. Doug Jones delivered his maiden speech on the Senate floor on Wednesday, tackling a topic that would seem anathema to most Southern Democrats — gun control.