Local Features

JOE SHLABOTNIK / Creative Commons License via flickr

In New England, New Hampshire is well known for tax-free liquor sales, which makes the Granite State a popular destination for out-of-staters looking to stock up on alcohol. 

Gabe Amo / Governor's Office

Governor Gina Raimondo’s senior advisor on drug policy, Tom Coderre, said all options should be on the table to deal with the state’s opioid crisis, including safe injection sites. 

Creative Commons License via Wikimedia

Did that dog bed you got at L.L. Bean 5 years ago get chewed by its occupant?  Until last week, you could just take it back and get a replacement for no charge.  The company has announced that it's changing its famous unconditional return policy that has been a part of the brand since it started more than a century ago.  The change comes as a response to the growing number of customers who have been taking advantage of the policy.

Will Rogers / Facebook

For dairy farms in New England, the outlook for milk prices is not good this year. The stress has been tied to suicides among dairy farmers.

RIPR Series: One Square Mile Johnston

Feb 12, 2018
Elisabeth Harrison

After the 2017 presidential election, RIPR produced "One Square Mile: Johnston," a week of stories about the northern Rhode Island town that flipped the most dramatically from blue to red in voting for President Donald Trump.

We explored the town's politics, learned how to make a true Italian-American meatball and visited some little-known spots that reveal Johnston’s culture and history.

Lynn Arditi / RIPR

Larry and Loretta are my neighbor’s cats. And they love their canned cat food. To understand why just read the ingredients on the label. Ocean white fish. Fish broth. Tuna. Those ingredients are actually fish by-products. Fish guts. Fish  livers. Fish intestines. Fish skins. They’re what fish processors like Bergie’s Seafood in call “trash.”


Darn It!

Darn It! Inc. is a company that has thrived because of  -- rather than in spite of -- the overseas manufacturing that has put so many American textile companies out of business.

As part of our series “One Square Mile: New Bedford,” Darn It! founder and president Jeff Glassman told RIPR's Dave Fallon what the company does, how it came to be, and why he's optimistic about New Bedford.

Pearl Macek

Standing on New Bedford’s Acushnet Avenue, René Moreno runs into a man who grew up in the same village he did in Guatemala. They talk for a couple of minutes, and although you might assume they are speaking in Spanish, they aren’t.

They’re speaking K’iche, a Mayan language spoken in the highlands of Guatemala. 

Northeast Fisheries Science Center / NOAA

Is the scallop fishery well-managed? Most people, including scallop fishermen, scientists, and environmentalists, had the same answer: yes. 


New Bedford Whaling Museum

As part of our series One Square Mile: New Bedford, we look at the “Grand Panorama of a Whaling Voyage Round the World”, painted by New Bedford artists Benjamin Russell and Caleb Purrington. 


Ian Donnis / RIPR

Mike Goodman, executive director of the Public Policy Center at UMass-Dartmouth, joins Political Roundtable to discuss the evolution of New Bedford, the economic outlook for southeastern Massachusetts, and the impact of provincialism in the region.

John Bender / RIPR

The Port of New Bedford is often touted as the most lucrative in North America. That’s thanks mainly to the popularity, and apparent abundance, of scallops. But the success of scallops may be masking hard times for other parts of the fishing industry.

Lynn Arditi / RIPR

(This the second part of a two-part story. Read part one here.) 

Andrew Dillon has had a front row seat to the opioid epidemic in New Bedford. His diner is a favorite for local fishermen.

Courtesy EPA

The harbor is one of the largest EPA Superfund sites in the country, and a reminder of the city’s industrial waterfront.  


Lynn Arditi / RIPR

(This is the first part of a two-part story. Read part two here.)
 Commercial fishing consistently ranks as one world’s most dangerous jobs, which may help explain why fishermen have been hit hard by the opioid epidemic. 

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